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BREAKING NEWS

Gardens galore

By Staff | Jul 23, 2008

Karen Jensen’s three-acre yard is perfect for her to plant flower beds. EDN photos by Samantha Heerdt

Members of the Estherville Garden Club met at the Rock Garden early Tuesday morning for a brief meeting and breakfast before caravanning around town for a garden tour.

Maryann Martyr’s expansive garden was toured first. Her yard is filled with several flower beds, with a large variety of flowers including lilies, Virginia creeper and a yucca plant. Martyr has an herb garden as well as two small vegetable gardens. The fountain with pond makes a great place to rest and enjoy the view.

The second garden toured was at the home of Karen Jensen. “I wanted a cottage garden,” Jensen said. “I wanted to fill the yard with plants. I like to mix everything together.”

And what a mix it is. Her front yard contains various plants, everything from tomatoes and cilantro to lambs ear, lilies and astors.

Jensen has several native plants such as a compass plant that always points north and a native milkweed.

Val Schroeder’s roses stand tall in her garden.

The hidden garden belonging to Mary Schiltz was toured third. From the front of the house, a person would never know the depth of her garden. There are tall fences covered in Virginia creeper that provide privacy.

Eucalyptus, cone flowers, hostas and lilies are just a few of the plants in Schiltz’s backyard. A prominent feature is the pond that Schiltz built herself, fish included.

Neatly trimmed hedges give a backdrop for Norma Myers’ garden. Geraniums, hostas and roses fill the flower beds. A birdbath surrounded by begonias is a focal point of the garden. Calla lilies line the fence around the back patio.

The final garden toured belonged to the garden club president, Val Schroeder. Her garden was filled with lilies, hostas, zinnias and roses. Large hydrangea blooms would impress any gardener, as well as her indigo plant.

For information on joining the garden club, contact Bernie Gee at 362-7019.

The pond Mary Schiltz built even holds fish.