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BREAKING NEWS

Daily News Editorial

Jun 15, 2010

On Monday, which just incidentally happened to be Flag Day, Estherville VFW Post 3388 and American Legion Post 91 and their auxiliaries presented a number of historical flags to residents of the Estherville Good Samaritan Society. It was a great gesture that should not go unnoticed.

Undoubtedly, the Legion and VFW’s efforts were appreciated. Folks who are old enough to live in a retirement home are also of an age to truly appreciate the sacrifices of our troops in World War II.

However, we have certainly had significant conflicts since then, and the efforts of our soldiers today should be equally appreciated.

This past weekend, members of the local National Guard unit traveled to Camp Ripley for training before they have further training in other states before heading out for a nine-month tour of duty in Afghanistan. These are your neighbors, your sons and fathers, brothers and uncles, and in some cases daughters and mothers, sisters and aunts. And they are embarking on the greatest deployment of Iowa Guard members since World War II.

That should give us pause to consider what the flag is really like. Is it an abstract symbol, something that really has no meaning, or is it something that carries pride, honor and reverence to those who truly know its significance.

When the flag is raised on Memorial Day, Veterans Day or Flag Day, when Taps is played at a military funeral or patriotic observance or when that flag is folded and placed in the wrinkled, proud hands of the tearful widow of a veteran, then, yes, the flag does mean something more than a mere bit of cloth. It carries a significance of everything that went into it, those who fought and died and continue to serve in countries of impossible geography and sometimes unpronounceable names.

Yes, the efforts of both the Legion and VFW were greatly appreciated. But perhaps, just perhaps, the program they presented could be carried to younger generations, whether it’s at the Regional Wellness Center or daycare centers.

Over 2,000 American servicemen were killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor. Over 3,000 American citizens were killed on the American mainland Sept. 11, 2001. That is why we are at war today in Iraq and Afghanistan.

This is no time to be complacent over the meaning of our flag, nor is it a time to be complacent over the sacrifices of our servicemen and servicewomen. We owe them our greatest tribute. All of us, doctors and lawyers, Senators and CEOs included, should pay honor and homage to them.

They are our hope and our future. They are the difference between freedom and chaos.

Daily News Editorial

Jun 15, 2010

On Monday, which just incidentally happened to be Flag Day, Estherville VFW Post 3388 and American Legion Post 91 and their auxiliaries presented a number of historical flags to residents of the Estherville Good Samaritan Society. It was a great gesture that should not go unnoticed.

Undoubtedly, the Legion and VFW’s efforts were appreciated. Folks who are old enough to live in a retirement home are also of an age to truly appreciate the sacrifices of our troops in World War II.

However, we have certainly had significant conflicts since then, and the efforts of our soldiers today should be equally appreciated.

This past weekend, members of the local National Guard unit traveled to Camp Ripley for training before they have further training in other states before heading out for a nine-month tour of duty in Afghanistan. These are your neighbors, your sons and fathers, brothers and uncles, and in some cases daughters and mothers, sisters and aunts. And they are embarking on the greatest deployment of Iowa Guard members since World War II.

That should give us pause to consider what the flag is really like. Is it an abstract symbol, something that really has no meaning, or is it something that carries pride, honor and reverence to those who truly know its significance.

When the flag is raised on Memorial Day, Veterans Day or Flag Day, when Taps is played at a military funeral or patriotic observance or when that flag is folded and placed in the wrinkled, proud hands of the tearful widow of a veteran, then, yes, the flag does mean something more than a mere bit of cloth. It carries a significance of everything that went into it, those who fought and died and continue to serve in countries of impossible geography and sometimes unpronounceable names.

Yes, the efforts of both the Legion and VFW were greatly appreciated. But perhaps, just perhaps, the program they presented could be carried to younger generations, whether it’s at the Regional Wellness Center or daycare centers.

Over 2,000 American servicemen were killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor. Over 3,000 American citizens were killed on the American mainland Sept. 11, 2001. That is why we are at war today in Iraq and Afghanistan.

This is no time to be complacent over the meaning of our flag, nor is it a time to be complacent over the sacrifices of our servicemen and servicewomen. We owe them our greatest tribute. All of us, doctors and lawyers, Senators and CEOs included, should pay honor and homage to them.

They are our hope and our future. They are the difference between freedom and chaos.