×
×
homepage logo

Daily News Editorial

By Staff | Nov 15, 2008

In a speech this week, former Kansas Sen. Robert Dole, the 1996 Republican nominee for president, said the Obama administration should make health-care reform its top priority as it sets out to fix a quagmire of economic-related problems.

Obama has said the economy will be his top priority. But Dole also has a good point. In fact, the cost of health care has much to do with today’s cost of living.

There is no one answer to the questions of how we got here and how we’ll get out of it. The one thing we do know for certain, though, is that unless something is done, and soon, the economic problems we’re facing now because of the housing crisis, tightened credit markets and until very recently high energy prices will only continue. Baby Boomers, who are just now entering retirement, could very easily bankrupt Medicare and Medicaid if a way isn’t found to shore up our national health-care system and keep costs down.

We call them Baby Boomers because there were so many children born immediately after World War II. With families with four children the average, the national population mushroomed. With fewer children born after that time, though (2.2 per family is now about average), there will actually be fewer workers to help support our fragile national health-care system.

Something drastic needs to be done to contain health-care costs.

A good start would be to put a cap on medical liability lawsuits. Drugs are tested and retested and the vast majority are safe. What is in fact happening is that people are lining their pockets with the taxpayers’ hard-earned dollars. And that’s a shame.

Prevention is another key. ALL health plans, public and private, should give incentives to people who don’t smoke or who intend to quit smoking. The same goes for alcohol. A significant share of state and federal taxes on alcohol should go toward alcoholism-prevention programs. The same goes for fines for those found guilty of distributing illegal drugs.

Alternative therapies also need to be studied and accepted into Medicare and Medicaid programs. Anything that has been proven to ease patients’ pain and suffering or produce a cure should be an accepted medical procedure.

Dole is right. While the economy is the front-and-center problem right now, health care could very well be the biggest long-term problem our nation faces. Let’s just hope we don’t take too long to resolve the problem.

The clock is ticking …

Daily News Editorial

By Staff | Nov 15, 2008

In a speech this week, former Kansas Sen. Robert Dole, the 1996 Republican nominee for president, said the Obama administration should make health-care reform its top priority as it sets out to fix a quagmire of economic-related problems.

Obama has said the economy will be his top priority. But Dole also has a good point. In fact, the cost of health care has much to do with today’s cost of living.

There is no one answer to the questions of how we got here and how we’ll get out of it. The one thing we do know for certain, though, is that unless something is done, and soon, the economic problems we’re facing now because of the housing crisis, tightened credit markets and until very recently high energy prices will only continue. Baby Boomers, who are just now entering retirement, could very easily bankrupt Medicare and Medicaid if a way isn’t found to shore up our national health-care system and keep costs down.

We call them Baby Boomers because there were so many children born immediately after World War II. With families with four children the average, the national population mushroomed. With fewer children born after that time, though (2.2 per family is now about average), there will actually be fewer workers to help support our fragile national health-care system.

Something drastic needs to be done to contain health-care costs.

A good start would be to put a cap on medical liability lawsuits. Drugs are tested and retested and the vast majority are safe. What is in fact happening is that people are lining their pockets with the taxpayers’ hard-earned dollars. And that’s a shame.

Prevention is another key. ALL health plans, public and private, should give incentives to people who don’t smoke or who intend to quit smoking. The same goes for alcohol. A significant share of state and federal taxes on alcohol should go toward alcoholism-prevention programs. The same goes for fines for those found guilty of distributing illegal drugs.

Alternative therapies also need to be studied and accepted into Medicare and Medicaid programs. Anything that has been proven to ease patients’ pain and suffering or produce a cure should be an accepted medical procedure.

Dole is right. While the economy is the front-and-center problem right now, health care could very well be the biggest long-term problem our nation faces. Let’s just hope we don’t take too long to resolve the problem.

The clock is ticking …